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Web Designers’ Favourite Fonts

By Jamin Andrews
Web Designers’ Favourite Fonts

...and the font winner is...

Just before the envelope is opened, the name read out, the dash to the stage, the acceptance speech – you know the rest: “But first, let’s look at “the nominations”...

Let’s interrupt the ceremony for just a moment to wonder why we would even consider holding such an event. After all, it’s the words that matter, isn’t it? Well yes, but if you are speaking to someone, saying something important, then a large part of your message will be about your tone of voice. Consider your choice of fonts to be similar, helping you to say what you wish to best effect, as clearly and in as easy-to-read a way as possible.

...and the nominations in the Web Designers Favourite Fonts category are...

Garamond

Garamond Font

Claude Garamond was a publisher in 16th century France, credited as being the first to make design of type a speciality. He seemed to know his stuff, considering his fonts are still in regular usage half a millennium or so later! These old-style serif typefaces encourage easy, relaxed reading, being both functional and elegant in equal measures. You’ll find this style in documents, novels, poems and the like – and will have read each piece easily, probably without knowing why.

Helvetica

Helvetica Font

Helvetia is the Latin name for Switzerland, so you can guess where this font originated, with the amendment in title being due to other products already bearing the original. It was born in the 1950s as a typeface designed to become more popular than a rival of the Haas Type Foundry. It is now one of the most-used sans serif faces, and has been chosen for many corporate logos (Panasonic, Orange, Target and others) and public signage.

Futura

Futura Font

This truly versatile typeface, including bold and condensed variations, is a widely-used display tool. It retains high readability, even when condensed for tight spaces, or set at smaller font sizes when much information needs to be provided. It is also highly-regarded for areas such as captioning or quotations. It was released in 1927 and set a benchmark for many following geometric designs.

...and the winner is...

Entirely up to you! Choosing the style of font most suited to your message and how and where it is being delivered, is part of the art of communication. However, with these three proven winners, we hope we’ve provided some useful food for thought.